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Rad Ways to Up Your Likability Quotient at Work

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Likeable people:

  • Are genuinely glad to see you. They smile, look you in the eyes, and mirror your actions. That is, they laugh when you laugh, frown when you frown. Mimicking another person’s behavior (but not too much) shows you’re in accord with them.
  • Remember names. Because they remember our name we feel good—about ourselves and about them. (Here’s a tip: Before you forget a new person’s name, introduce them to a friend or colleague; that will reinforce your memory.)
  • Listen closely. They focus completely on the person they’re speaking with. They sincerely want to know what that person thinks, ask pointed questions, and don’t spend time worrying about what they themselves are going to say next.
  • Give sincere compliments. (But don’t overdo it.) Likeable people praise colleagues and clients for their contributions, their skills, their help on a project; even their appearance. This shows they are genuinely appreciative towards that person.
  • Don’t compete. They don’t “one-up” others. If an individual makes an exaggerated claim—instead of poo-pooing it, a likeable person might ask how that individual managed to accomplish their achievement. Should they need to dispute a statement, they do it with respect.
  • Admit mistakes. They’re not afraid to look silly or to poke fun at themselves. Others find this endearing and will let down their guard.
  • Use touch. Likable people shake hands or touch someone lightly on the upper arm or shoulder to show warmth toward that person.
  • Are non-judgmental. They approach everyone with an open-mind, assuming that people are acting in good faith. Should they believe another person has acted in a hurtful manner, they try to understand why.
  • Are consistent. Likable people are upbeat, friendly and considerate, day in and day out. Plus they treat everyone—from the CEO to the janitor—with respect. This makes them approachable and trustworthy.
  • Keep their cell phones out of sight. When in meetings, at a meal, or attending an informal get- together, their cells are tucked away so that they can be fully present.

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