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How Successful People Overcome Procrastination

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When we procrastinate, we become our own worst enemies, creating untold drama, stress, and even health issues for ourselves. Here’s how successful people overcome some of the worst types of procrastination—and reach for all they’re capable of. Successful people:

1) Start with the hardest task of the day.
Though they don’t enjoy having uncomfortable conversations, carrying out tough negotiations, or creating complicated reports, successful people know these tasks simply won’t disappear. They tackle their most daunting issues first and—presto—those issues are behind them!

2) Eschew perfectionism.
Successful people understand that perfection is a nearly impossible goal. They don’t put off a job because of their own or another person’s sky-high standards. To put it another way, they’re not afraid to fail. They understand that procrastinating makes failure more, not less, likely. These realists focus on what’s possible to accomplish in a given amount of time, while still striving for excellence.

3) Take action.
Successful people “Just do it.” They’re outstanding organizers who create sensible schedules and prioritize tasks—daily, weekly and monthly. They don’t seek out distractions, like continuously checking email and scanning their Facebook page, or chatting with everyone who passes by. Last, but hardly least, they realize that the more they procrastinate, the more likely it is that a crisis will arise and derail their project entirely.

4) Admit when they need help.
Rather than put off a task when they’re unsure of how to proceed, successful people ask for help. They might consult with a colleague or the boss, or even take a class. They’re comfortable with the need to improve a particular skill, are not afraid to admit it, and are willing to take the steps necessary to get better.

5) Believe in themselves.
Successful people believe in their ability to achieve the goals they set. Should their inner voice start to berate them: “You’re not good enough,” or “You’ll never get this done,” they answer back with: “I am more than good enough and perfectly capable of carrying this out.” They face their doubts and refute them!

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